A Buyer’s Epoxy Countertop Calculating Guide

You want to purchase epoxy countertops but are turned off by the cost.  Why don’t you make one yourself? It’s not as difficult as you think, and you’ll feel good knowing that you’ve got a one-of-a-kind item in your house.

We’ll go over everything you need to know to get the work done right the first time.

Epoxy Resin Coverage Calculator

Calculating how much epoxy resin is needed for a given project is critical to achieving a successful application.

This should go without saying, but many people are unaware that you can’t simply pick up where you left off and pour more mixed epoxy. This is especially true in large pour areas. You need an epoxy resin calculator. 

How to Calculate Epoxy Resin Coverage

Calculating Epoxy Amount When Coating a Rectangular Surface:

  1. Measure the length and width of the countertop in inches.
  2. Estimate the thickness of epoxy resin you want.
  3. Multiply these three measurements together to calculate the volume needed for the countertop. The result you get will have a cubic-inch volume unit.
  4. Convert this to US fluid ounces by dividing it by 1.805. If you want to use gallons, divide the fluid ounces by 128.

Calculating Epoxy Coverage When Coating a Round Surface:

  1. Measure the diameter of the countertop.
  2. Divide the diameter by two (2) to get the radius.
  3. Calculate the volume in cubic inches by multiplying the radius by itself and then by pi (3.1416) and the desired epoxy resin thickness. The formula will look like this, radius² x 3.14 x desired epoxy coating thickness.
  4. Divide the cubic-inch result by 1.805 to convert the volume to US fluid ounces. Divide fluid ounces by 128 if you want to use gallons.

Note: These two formulas do not calculate the epoxy needed to cover the edges or spills from mixing or pouring.

It’s Better to Have More Over Less

Yes, it’s better to get more epoxy than what you have calculated. Underestimating the amount of epoxy needed can end up costing you more. The reason is simple, epoxy hardens within 20 to 30 minutes after pouring.

If you run out of epoxy mid-project, you need to redo the entire project. Otherwise, it will leave behind a visible line where the two batches of pours match up.

Failing to Measure Epoxy Coverage Properly

Most countertop epoxy mixes should have a 1:1 ratio for the hardener and the epoxy itself. Using too much or too little hardener will end up in a soft epoxy or brittle epoxy countertop surface.

To avoid this from happening, use two clear one-gallon buckets with measuring scales on the sides. You can buy these from your local hardware store.

Is a Seal Coat Needed for Epoxy Countertops?

Sealing an epoxy countertop is often needed. A seal coat refers to the first layer of epoxy applied to the surface. It should be allowed to dry and set before applying the next layer.

A seal coat helps fill the areas with air bubbles and blisters. It is highly recommended when laminating wood, doing encapsulation projects, and mixing with porous substrates.

Important: The seal coat volume should be considered when calculating the total epoxy required for an epoxy countertop project.

Epoxy Overflow Allowance

An overflow allowance has to be accounted for in the load or coverage calculation unless you’re working on framed epoxy resin pegboards.

Many coating projects allow the epoxy pour to glide over the sides to coat the corners and edges. How much you need for an overflow is tricky to estimate or calculate. It is another reason why buying more than the volume calculated is recommended.

How Much Epoxy Do You Need to Get a Durable Thickness?

Most mixed epoxy products are designed to self-level to create a 1/8 inch thick layer, also known as the flood coat.

If you need your coat to be a thicker flood coat, you need to use a dam or mold to keep the epoxy from flowing towards the edges. A coating layer thinner than the standard is not recommended as it may have less durability.

How Long Does It Take to Make an Epoxy Countertop?

The most crucial consideration in the pouring process is the curing time of the seal coat and epoxy layers. Generally, it takes over a week to make an epoxy countertop. This is because it takes a while for the seal or topcoat to cure, about 24 hours on the estimate.

However, the following layers can be finished within three to four hours, depending on your desired thickness.

Epoxy Resin Application Tips

Applying resin to countertops is simple if you follow the rules and keep these tips in mind:

  • Only use a plastic, unwaxed paper, or metal container to hold the epoxy resin and hardener. Do not use foam mixing cups as the epoxy can dissolve in them. Avoid glass mixing containers too. They can create a reaction with the mixture.
  • The epoxy resin needs to be thoroughly mixed to get a smooth and proper cure. Avoid lifting and whipping as they add blisters or air bubbles. Always scrape the sides for unmixed material remains. This is to avoid sticky or hardener-saturated portions.
  • Oil, grease, wax, or other foreign materials can leave irregular textures on the epoxy surface and can drastically slow the cure of your load. Make sure to clean your work area before pouring.
  • Epoxy resin is in liquid form before it hardens, and it can flow off the edges and in between tiles. It can also stain cabinets and appliances. Protect the surrounding surfaces with plastic sheeting, and use wooden blocks to keep epoxy from flowing out.

Hire Professionals to Work on Your Epoxy Countertop

We hope you find this epoxy resin calculation guide useful for your own epoxy countertop project. Remember, the key is preparation and presence of mind. Make sure to have everything you need at hand, and think before executing each task, especially pouring the initial seal coat.

If you need professional help on your epoxy resin sink, countertop, pegboard, and tabletop projects, reach out to our epoxy countertop specialists.

Our over 30 years of experience in the industry has helped us understand our products with an expert’s knowledge. For a free consultation, contact us at 800-476-5228 at ResinTops.net today!

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